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West Virginia Coalition Against Domestic Violence

SAFETY ALERT: If you are in danger, please use a safer computer, or call 911, your local hotline, or the U.S. National Domestic Violence Hotline at 1-800-799-7233 The West Virginia Coalition Against Domestic Violence is a statewide network of community-based domestic violence programs and statewide office working to end personal and institutional violence in the lives of women, children and men. WVCADV works to transform social, cultural, and political attitudes in ways that promote values of respect, mutuality, accountability and non-violence through: Public Awareness Policy Development Community Organizing Training & Technical Assistance Advocacy Collaborative Projects
West Virginia Coalition Against Domestic Violence
West Virginia Coalition Against Domestic Violence
Great Rising.. 😃❤️

Southern Blacks were banned from eating Vanilla Ice Cream during the Jim Crow Era, except on the 4th of July. The racist hierarchy in the South manifested in several ways, but most people don’t know that racism even impacted what foods blacks were allowed to buy. As Maya Angelou once wrote, it was custom not to sell vanilla ice cream to blacks in many parts of the South, except on Independence Day. Although it was a black enslaved named Edmund Albius who perfected the flavor of vanilla ice cream its white sweetness was viewed as a representation of the American dream, which is why blacks were kept from eating it !!!
West Virginia Coalition Against Domestic Violence
West Virginia Coalition Against Domestic Violence
Black History

A sundown or sunset town was a town, city, or neighborhood in the US that excluded non-whites after dark. The term sundown came from the signs that were posted stating that people of color had to leave the town by sundown. In most cases, signs were placed at the town's borders which read: "Negro, Don't Let the Sun Set On You Here." The exclusion was official town policy or through restrictive covenants agreed to by the real estate agents of the community. Often, the policy was enforced through intimidation. This intimidation could occur in a number of ways, including harassment by law enforcement officers or neighbors, and in some circumstances violence. The phenomenon of sundown towns was the impetus for Harlem civil rights activist Victor Green to write the Negro Motorist Green Book, which detailed safe places for Black travelers to rest and eat without fear of harassment, threats or death. With the 1968 Fair Housing Act, sundown towns became illegal -- on paper. Many people are surprised to learn that some of the places they live, were once sundown towns. Theses towns existed across the country, not just in the south as most presumed.
Read more -https://apnews.com/.../virus-outbreak-race-and-ethnicity...
https://sundown.tougaloo.edu/sundowntowns.php
West Virginia Coalition Against Domestic Violence
West Virginia Coalition Against Domestic Violence
👸🏾Little Known Black History Fact 👸🏾

In the time of slavery in Colombia, hair braiding was used to relay messages. For example, to signal that they wanted to escape, women would braid a hairstyle called departes. It had thick, tight braids, braided closely to the scalp and was tied into buns on the top.

And another style had curved braids, tightly braided on their heads. The curved braids would represent the roads they would use to escape. In the braids, they also kept gold and hid seeds which, in the long run, helped them survive after they escaped.
West Virginia Coalition Against Domestic Violence
West Virginia Coalition Against Domestic Violence
Conceived by rape, born on a cotton plantation, never certain who her father was, abandoned by her mother, abused as a child because she was "yaller" and was forced to live in the crawl space under the house with the cats.

She rose to become an internationally beloved singer, dancer, actor, and comedienne. She was an anti-war activist and member of the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom, who gained the wrath of President Johnson and was harassed for years by the FBI. A vocal advocate of LGBT rights.

Asked about her following from and affinity for the gay community, she said, "We're all rejected people, we know what it is to be refused, we know what it is to be oppressed, depressed, and then, accused, and I am very much cognizant of that feeling. Nothing in the world is more painful than rejection."

Eartha Kitt. SHE PERSISTED.
West Virginia Coalition Against Domestic Violence
West Virginia Coalition Against Domestic Violence
Domestic violence is a leading cause of homelessness. AND systemic racism exacerbates the dangers of housing insecurity for Black, Indigenous, and other survivors of color. Watch and learn more about #DVhousing.🏘
West Virginia Coalition Against Domestic Violence
National Resource Center on Domestic Violence
Domestic violence is a leading cause of homelessness. AND systemic racism exacerbates the dangers of housing insecurity for Black, Indigenous, and other survivors of color. Watch and learn more about #DVhousing.🏘
West Virginia Coalition Against Domestic Violence
West Virginia Coalition Against Domestic Violence
TW: Dating Violence
Dating violence is more common than you think. 1 in 3 teens experience physical, sexual, or emotional abuse before they become adults. Want to help a loved one in an unhealthy or abusive relationship? Check out these resources Love is respect #TeenDVMonth #loveisrespect http://ow.ly/eqYA50DBbeR

No More “Speechless” Celebrity Campaign

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NO MORE is a unifying symbol and movement to raise public awareness and engage bystanders around ending domestic violence and sexual assault. Launched in March 2013 by a coalition of leading advocacy groups, service providers, the U.S. Department of Justice and major corporations, NO MORE is supported by hundreds of national and local groups and by thousands of individuals, organizations, universities, and communities who are using its signature blue symbol to increase visibility for domestic violence and sexual assault.